Oracle celebrates upcoming Java 7 release on video

Oracle recently celebrated the upcoming release of Java 7 with great pomp and show and subsequently made recordings of the event available as a series of videos available. If you haven’t already done so watch the videos in order below and read the blog post. There are also some thoughts on what’s upcoming in Java 8 in the final Q&A video.

It’s great to see Oracle engaging with the community to this extent and so publicly. This could have been just another release but I’m glad it received more publicity and visibility in this way, particularly, giving sub-project leads within Java 7 the recognition they deserve and the inspiration to carry on doing their great work I hope. I’ve also subscribed to the Oracle Java Magazine to see what it offers in due time.

Introducing Java 7: Moving Java Forward

Technical breakout sessions

In addition to the main presentation there were also smaller and more specialised technical breakout sessions as below.

Making Heads and Tails of Project Coin, Small Language Changes in JDK 7 (slides)

Divide and Conquer Parallelism with the Fork/Join Framework (slides)

The New File System API in JDK 7 (slides)

A Renaissance VM: One Platform, Many Languages (slides)

Meet the Experts: Q&A and Panel Discussion


A few thoughts that occurred to me having watched the above presentations follow below.

  • In Joe’s presentation I realised just how important good editor support is to prompt developers to adopt the project coin proposals over older ways of achieving the same ends. I was very impressed watching Netbeans detecting older syntax, prompting the developer through providing helpful warnings and being able to change old to new syntax instantaneously. I really hope Eclipse does the same. Eclipse has asked for quick fix, refactoring and template suggestions and in response to that I would say the most important incorporations above supporting the language would be supporting idiomatic transitions from Java 6 and Java 7.
  • Watching Joe Darcy go through how they implemented switch on strings and the associated performance considerations was fascinating. They actually use the hashcode values of strings to generate offsets and then use the offsets to execute the logic in the original case statements.
  • I found it very cool that Stuart Marks actually retrofitted the existing JDK code to utilise some of the Project Coin features not by hand but in an automated fashion. Apparently the JDK team also used annotation based processing and netbeans based tooling to help them upgrade the JDK codebase to use the new features.